Dismiss

FT drops online paywall for 24 hours as it launches campaign to 'reset' capitalism

The Financial Times will make its online journalism available for free for 24 hours globally to promote a campaign for a “better form of capitalism”.

The title will launch the “open day” from 4pm today, providing access to content that would normally sit behind a paywall.

Readers will still have to pay for tomorrow’s print edition in the UK, but up to 7,000 copies will be handed out for free in New York City with the purchase of select US newspapers.

The FT’s decision to drop its paywall for 24 hours comes after it unveiled its New Agenda campaign platform yesterday.

Editorial pieces on the new platform have so far addressed economic inequality, the future of liberalism and capitalism and advertising revenue going towards disinformation outlets.

In a statement on the New Agenda campaign, FT editor Lionel Barber said: “The Financial Times believes in free enterprise capitalism. It is the foundation for the creation of wealth which provides more jobs, more money and more taxes.

“The liberal capitalist model has delivered peace, prosperity and technological progress for the past 50 years, dramatically reducing poverty and raising living standards throughout the world.

“But, in the decade since the global financial crisis, the model has come under strain, particularly the focus on maximising profits and shareholder value.”

“These principles of good business are necessary but not sufficient.

“The long-term health of free enterprise capitalism will depend on delivering profit with purpose. Companies will come to understand that this combination serves their self-interest as well as their customers and employees. Without change, the prescription risks being far more painful.”

Barber added: ” It is time for a reset”.

Tomorrow’s print edition of the FT will come in a wrap advertising the New Agenda campaign.

Picture: Financial Times

Comments

2 thoughts on “FT drops online paywall for 24 hours as it launches campaign to 'reset' capitalism”

  1. Very tricky. It’s at times like these I am thankful not to work at the Sun – damned if you do, sacked if you don’t.

    There are many stories that get published that one or other party would prefer to keep private, but they are still news. And from what I understand, this was already in the public domain, albeit many years ago and on the other side of the world.

    Against that it has to be considered what is the public benefit of raising this after so long and what effect might it have on the family, raking over an old tragedy.

    On balance I would have published. I would have tried to cover it in as sensitive a way as possible, run alongside helpful extras about domestic violence, etc to try and bring some good out of the misery. I think a decent donation to a relevant charity would also not go amiss so as to make sure this was not seen as naked profiteering from others’ grief.

    It would be interesting to see what the circulation figures were.

    1. Why? You’ve just given a number of excuses for resisting or not resisting the urge to publish but you haven’t given one good reason why its right. As I always used to say to students when faced with a load of excuses why the had erred,
      ‘you’ve given me several excuses but that still doesn’t make it rigth does it?’

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *