The Big Issue records third straight year of circulation growth with sales at five-year high

The Big Issue has recorded its third consecutive year of circulation growth, bringing figures for 2017 to their highest level in five years.

The magazine, which is sold on the streets by those affected by poverty, now circulates 83,073 copies every week, according to the latest ABC figures for 2017.

The figures represent a 7 per cent circulation increase over three years.

The magazine is sold for £2.50, with vendors pocketing £1.25.

Big Issue editor Paul McNamee said: “The Big Issue is totally unique.

“We exist to give the poorest in society, those who may feel society has left them behind, a means to earn a living and pull themselves back up.

“It’s a community – of vendors, of readers and supporters, of staff. We’re woven into the fabric of Britain’s high streets and in its hearts and minds. It’s incredible that this sense of identity continues to grow, in our 27th year of existence.

“It’s wonderful that our readers have stayed with us, that they have found the words, and the identity and the attitude they love in the pages we produce. It’s testament to the incredible work of everybody in the organisation.

“So long as we are needed, we will be here. And we’ll continue to work to buck all received notions of what people will pay. We’ll continue to produce quality, must-read journalism. On we go.”

The magazine claims to have sold more than 200m copies since its launch in 1991.

In October last year, filmmaker Armando Ianucci guest edited an issue featuring a five-page exclusive debate in which Alan Partridge and Malcolm Tucker “squared-off” over Brexit.

Picture: The Big Issue


1 thought on “The Big Issue records third straight year of circulation growth with sales at five-year high”

  1. “The Big Issue is totally unique.” But it is just one among many international ‘street papers’, including those featured in the Big Issue’s own long-running series spotlighting each.

    “So long as we are needed, we will be here. ” The Big Issue has never been needed or wanted. Far from solving homelessness, it encourages, enables and perpetuates it by creating a cushy number (easy money for doing virtually zero, and certainly nothing that an unmanned dispenser or honesty box could not achieve far more efficiently), hence removing vendors’ incentive to get a job and seek accommodation.

    Circulation growth by, and continued existence of, the Big Issue are testament to its abject failure. If it worked as an anti-homelessness/-poverty tool, its circulation would be falling due to lack of ‘need’, or – ideally – it would have closed.

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